Online Homogenisation Colloquium

Now that online meetings have been established and greatly reduce travel costs the homogenisation community has decided to try whether an online Homogenisation Colloquium works. We hope this can engage a wider community than in-person meetings.

The organising team are: Athanassios Argiriou, Chimani Barbara, Vanda Cabrinha Pires, Mary Curley, Beatrix Izsàk and Victor Venema. Please send us suggestions on interesting studies and topics for the next colloquium.

Announcements on future colloquiums will be send to the Homogenisation List.

First online meeting

The first meeting on Wednesday, 12 May 2021, will have talks for the first 90 minutes (see program below) and discuss the format the last 30 minutes. (In later colloquiums the last part will be used for open discussions on any homogenization problems people may have.) You can join via Zoom. (No need to register.)

Something to discuss is whether we prefer the colloquiums to be more formal with talks about mostly finished work, have more educational talks, discus about one study or give an overview over multiple studies, or talk more informally about ongoing studies, seeking feedback. Recording the colloquium could help colleagues who are unable to attend (given their time zone), but would probably reduce the willingness of presenters to show unfinished work.

We should also discus topics. Some have suggested to not only do homogenisation, but also quality control and data rescue. Another option could be to simply make separate colloquiums for that. There is no need to bundle topics for virtual meetings like there is for physical meeting with much overhead. Organizers of colloquiums for related topics are welcome to use the same infrastructure (distribution list and video call systems).

Program first meeting

Times are in Central European Summer time.

14:45 Doors open

15:00 Enric Aguilar: introductory talk on homogenisation

15:30 Peter Thorne: Assessing potential of sparse‐input reanalyses for centennial‐scale land surface air temperature homogenisation

15:50 Graziano Coppa: Metrological evaluation of the effect of the presence of a road on near‐surface air temperatures

16:10 Oleg Skrynyk: Uncertainty evaluation of Climatol’s adjustment algorithm applied to daily air temperature time series

16:30-17:00 Everyone: future of the Homogenisation Colloquium

References

Gillespie, IM, Haimberger, L, Compo, GP, Thorne, PW. Assessing potential of sparse‐input reanalyses for centennial‐scale land surface air temperature homogenisation. Int J Climatol., 2021; 41 (Suppl. 1): E3000– E3020. https://doi.org/10.1002/joc.6898

Skrynyk, O, Aguilar, E, Guijarro, J, Randriamarolaza, LYA, Bubin, S.
Uncertainty evaluation of Climatol’s adjustment algorithm applied to daily air temperature time series. Int J Climatol., 2021; 41 (Suppl. 1): E2395– E2419. https://doi.org/10.1002/joc.6854

Coppa, G, Quarello, A, Steeneveld, G‐J, Jandrić, N, Merlone, A.
Metrological evaluation of the effect of the presence of a road on near‐surface air temperatures. Int J Climatol., 2021; 1– 20. https://doi.org/10.1002/joc.7044

How it all started

The 2020 pandemic Budapest Seminar was well visited, many were new people who might not have been able to go to an in-person meeting. So in the chat the idea emerged to experiment with an Online Homogenization Colloquium.

To get a first idea about the format we made a survey via the Homogenisation List. People clearly prefer a mix of talks and open discussions on any homogenization problems people may have.

There is also a clear preference for quarterly over monthly meetings. The colloquium will start at 3pm Central European Time. This way people in the Americas can join us in the morning and Asia in the evening.

The length of the colloquium was a toss up in the survey, it is about 50/50 for 90 minutes or two hours. So we will start with 90 minutes and when we notice we have too much material we can extend it later.

More information

Linguistic tricks to grab your online audience’s Attention – Virtual meetings can suck the life out of a presentation. Pausing, probing and varying your pitch will keep your muted listeners hooked.